May. 23rd, 2013

madshutterbug: (c)2009 by Myself (Houdini&I)
We are now the owners of a John Deere 2210 Estate Tractor. The last two words are Herself's description. I like them, however, as it is accurate in my mind. Much heftier than the El Toro Yard Tractor Mower, not so hefty at all as Harrison Ford 8N Tractor, who still abides in a tractor coma, basic life support continuing until we can resuscitate him. Resuscitate him we will, for we need the services of his heft as well.

Indeed, the individual we purchased the Deere from (along with attachments, more later) makes a living working on yard tractors up through the heavier ones. Just now, in the Merry Month of May, he's quite busy with the yard maintenance crew, getting their beasts tuned up for the Summer Season. He looked over Harrison while here, made a couple suggestions for the coma maintenance, and said he'll be happy to take on the rest of the mechanical resuscitation later, when the Summer Season is winding down. Say, September.

Meanwhile, we now own a functioning tractor, with useful implements. A front end loader, which is specific to the new beast. Two hole augers (15cm & 20cm) and a plow attachment. The hole augers will also mount and work on Harrison Ford 8N.

It is diesel powered, which means another fuel storage. Not a big deal, though, and already obtained one fuel carboy in Yellow. On this side of the Ponds, petrol (gasoline) stores in red, diesel in yellow, kerosene (paraffin for the UK folk) in blue. We've some kerosene about for lamps when the power fails, and petrol for both tractors plus others as needed. Now we've some diesel as well.

State of the Studio

Not a lot of much, at this point, as we've been catching up somewhat with things needed about the House or the Ranch. Did fit in a short session with a model new to me, outdoors here on the Ranch so around and about places photographed before. I still enjoy photographing those places; one copse possesses such a fairy ring feel, others filter the light delightfully. On the other hand, I'm proving to myself I'm definitely getting to the point in my shooting career I need to think very hard on camera support. Lot of motion blur in this session, and likely the majority of that is my moving the camera.

Now, I did choose a lower ISO in part because I've always shot for maximum sharpness. No, not that exactly, as I did (and do still on occasion) push things for the grainy (in film) noisy (in digital) feel to the image. However, since I like making Big Prints, sharpness becomes an issue unless things are planned to use that blur.

Tripods are the first answer coming to mind, and I opted not to bring one with me on the walkabout. There are a number of tripods in my inventory, older, newer. I use two in particular fairly regularly, a moderately lightweight one for the walkabout, and a heavier one which I acquired from Clyde, Herself's father, when I purchased a then-old video camera after he upgraded his equipment. (Note: from that purchase, the tripod is still in service. I've not tried the video camera for a long time; it is designed to work with a separate VCR recorder, eh. There is also a steel hardshell case for the camera and a couple accessories. I should pull that out and look to refurbishing for other uses.)

I did bring my monopod on the walk, didn't use it as anything other than a walking stick. Why not, eh? Well, the monopod with the camera mounted is a one-position only shooting support. I've put one of the older tripod pan heads onto it before, moved that head back to that tripod. Might re-think that position, as the older tripod it comes off is not being used much as is. On the other hand, I'd like a somewhat different head than that one for the monopod. Do want a head on the monopod, because then I'd be more likely to use it... and it appears I really do need to use it.

That's the summary of things up to today. Oh, new roof work on the Big House is nearly complete. Yea! It's already complete enough that recent rainfall demonstrated the new roof will be a big improvement in life. The metal roofing extends past the eaves approximately 7 cm, and water run-off is far less likely to spatter back onto the side of the house, which means also less likely to spatter back into open windows. Which means in the times of year we leave windows open because temperatures & humidity are generally nice, we're less likely to get splash if a rain comes along and we aren't home, say.

Along with the metal roof itself (and the total re-decking we did underneath that) the roof vents are different from original manufacturer. Any and all houses need venting for the under-roof (attic) space. Moisture builds up simply from humidity, and without venting will start to rot ones house from inside. The original vents, five each half of the house, were 10 cm holes covered by mushroom caps, off ridge because hey, House did start off as Manufactured Housing so transported to site by halves. The new vents are rectangles, and the venting hole itself is 15 cm by 75 cm so they move a whole lot more air. Our roofer (happens to be a friend of ours long standing, I will happily provide name and contact to anyone Baja Jorja local who needs such work done) also installed flexible duct from the bathroom ceiling fans (three total) up to the off-ridge vents. This accomplishes the ventilation of the bathrooms without adding another hole through the roof! Fewer holes in refurbished new roof! Woohoo!

September 2015

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